So you have a year or less of racing under your belt and now you want to go faster and you have determined that your run is where you believe you can reap the most gains in obtaining this goal. A basic premise to running faster is to simply increase your stride turnover and stride length.Yet there is another run premise that insists that, in order to run fast in a race, one has to run fast in training. The focus of the drills that follow is to address setting the stage (increase your stride turnover and stride length) that will result in efficient run biomechanics that allow for fast run training.

Before you get started, here are some basic rules to follow when starting drill and technique work in order to get the most out of your workout and avoid injury.

  • Warm up with a 10-15-minute easy jog and conclude the warm-up with some light stretching before commencing the drills.
  • Cool down with a 10-15-minute easy jog and finish the workout with light stretching
  • Use a soft surface like a football or soccer field, or an artificial surfaced track
  • Work in drill and technique work once per week
  • Always focus on your form – head high, look at the horizon, arms to the side, pelvis out, loose ja

All-out Build-ups/Strides

This is a100-meter build up at 95% effort. Form is crucial with this drill, so focus on keeping your head up, pump your arms, look forward and drive your legs hard. You should hit your maximum speed at 50 meters, hold your maximum speed for 25 meters, then gradually and carefully, reduce your speed in a controlled manner to a jog for the last 25 meters. Jog back slowly to where you started and repeat the drill. Start with four repetitions and work your way up to eight. This drill can be also added to the end of a long run or a shorter mid-week run.

Quick Feet

Start with a slow jog then start a short stride bouncing on your toes while lifting your knees as high as possible on each stride. Focus on limiting the time your foot has contact with the ground. As soon as your foot hits the ground, quickly spring off the ground and into the high knee position. Swinging your arms is an essential part of this drill.Slowly move forward for 45-seconds and recover with a walk or easy jog for 90-seconds. Start with three repetitions and work your way up to six.

Butt/Heel Kicks

Using a short stride while bouncing off your toes, raise your heels as high as possible behind your body and make contact with buttocks with your heels. This drill involves mostly the lower leg with limited movement of upper leg when done properly. Concentrate on raising your heels and using your arms to drive you forward. There is limited distance covered during this drill, so perform the drill 45-seconds and then recover with a walk or easy jog for 90-seconds. Start with three repetitions and work your way up to six.

Quick Strides

This is a 100-meter run that begins with a slow jog. Increase your stride turnover rate so that you are taking as many strides as you can possible get in for a predetermined 25 meters. Focus on foot speed and quickness. Try to limit the time the ball of the foot remains in contact with the surface. As soon as one foot hits the surface, start initiating the next stride with your other foot. Start with three repetitions of 25 meters of quick strides and increase to 50 and 75 meters of quick strides with a walk or easy recovery jog for 90 seconds.

High Knees

Using a short stride and bouncing on your toes, bring your knees as high as possible on each stride. Focus on knee height and using your arms to drive this drill. This drill is for technique, not for speed, there for attempt to keep a pace of one stride per-second. Like most drills, there is very little forward movement, so perform the drill for 45-seconds and then recover with a walk or easy jog for 90-seconds. Start with three repetitions and work your way up to six.

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