For many, running fast off the bike is the hardest part of the race and takes year of practice to get comfortable with. Establishing a longterm plan for running well off the bike for the 5k up to marathon distance is of the utmost importance if you want to be top finisher in your age group We checked in with Kona marathon record holder and 2017 Ironman World Champion Patrick Lange, to hear his top tips for a fast and successful run off the bike. Lange impressed the triathlon world last October with his blistering 2:39:28 marathon that secured him a podium finish in his Kona debut and backed up that performance this October with another 2:40 marathon for an incredible come-from-behind win.

Lange’s tips take into consideration all distances of triathlon and include small details that will make a big difference on race day. You can start to work these into your training in the off-/early season:

Relax

For long distance triathletes, I recommend that for 80% of your brick workouts, there is no stress between the disciplines. So, put your bike away, drink a cola, change and start your run relaxed.

Muscle memory

Short distance triathletes should practice quick transitions and a fast pace for the first two kilometres. This is something that should become second nature after enough practice.

Check in with yourself throughout the run

For long distance races it is important to listen to your body and to take the first kilometres easy. Use this time to do a full body check-in from head to toe to see how you are running in that moment. Ask yourself questions like “how am I feeling?” and “how is my running form?” This will help you complete the remainder of your run without burning out and help you adjust your race plan accordingly.

The early stages of the race are crucial to a good run

Think ahead. It’s crucial to take in enough nutrition on the bike so that your energy stays in the “green zone” during the run.

A final pro tip

For the half distance and up, my final tips is to always wear socks

Translated from German.